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Card Slinger J

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Card Slinger J last won the day on July 16

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About Card Slinger J

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  • Birthday 11/02/1983

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  1. Game Launched! Initial thoughts...

    What If that zero value option is considered illegal? Gambling in the U.S. is defined in three parts: Consideration Chance Prize If all three attributes are present in an offering then it's considered gambling. Consideration means payment (not necessarily money). Do you pay anything for a booster pack of Pokémon TCG cards? If so then that is consideration. Interestingly, it doesn't matter who receives the money (in most cases) or the amount of money. If you pay one penny for a booster pack of cards that is guaranteed to contain a card worth $100 then that is still consideration. Does skill or chance affect the offering? If so is it over 50% chance or 50% skill? If the offering is over 50% affected by chance then it's a game of chance. Do you receive anything of easily quantifiable value for your participation? Then that's considered a prize. If you answered yes to the above three questions then what you're doing is considered gambling. So why hasn't the Trading Card Game / Collectible Card Game model been stopped in federal court? Well the short answer is that they aren't harmful enough. After a review of cases it appears that the most prominent lawsuits brought against trading card publishers have been dismissed. Beyond the test to determine If something is gambling or not, all U.S. courts (and most courts worldwide as this comes from common law) have requirements that must be met for a lawsuit to be filed. Almost all courts require a plaintiff to have standing - that is essentially a good reason to be the person bringing that particular lawsuit. So far the cases regarding this subject matter have been dismissed as the courts claimed the plaintiff's failed to show that they've been harmed in some way whether it was physical or psychological. In other words, Trading Cards have a strong chance of being recognized as gambling. However courtrooms are serious places so unless someone was seriously harmed through the purchase of trading cards, it's highly unlikely to be considered by court. The real test will come in the next 5-10 years as our generation grew up on TCG's with the next presumably on digital versions (as much as I hate to admit it). We'll soon have more data on the behaviors of adults who grew up with these "gambling simulators" and what their behavior is like as adults. Given that most mainstream TCG's (MTG, Yu-Gi-Oh!, Pokémon) are made up of high stake gamblers from Wall Street as well as Crypto Investors, it's not looking too good for the defenders of this business practice from insider trading with prior knowledge of the release of a product before release day to preferential treatment for people who shill for these companies.
  2. Game Launched! Initial thoughts...

    Thought I'd share this article with you guys in relation to Valve's new digital card game 'Artifact' - https://motherboard.vice.com/en_us/article/xwjv8w/valves-new-game-artifact-is-a-perfect-machine-for-making-money
  3. KeyForge by Richard Garfield

    KeyForge is a unique card game created by Richard Garfield and published by Fantasy Flight Games. In it, players take on the role of Archons in the world of the Crucible. Each Archon races to be the first to collect "Æmber" and forge three keys. As the first "Unique Deck Game", KeyForge is sold in individual decks containing 37 random cards. No two decks are the same, with 104 septillion possible deck combinations. Here's what the creator of Magic: the Gathering had to say about the origin of KeyForge: So you're telling me that KeyForge is a game intended to be played by cracking a new deck every time you sit down and isn't bound by the Secondary Market like Trading Card Games / Collectible Card Games are? Color me impressed. I'm starting to get the feeling that there's a spiritual awakening going around, and the 'Key' is a very positive symbol. 'Magic' on the other hand is the most negative symbol out there. Garfield must have a very interesting calling in his life. As for how gameplay works in KeyForge, it's a two-player game with each player using a single deck of cards to play creatures, artifacts, actions and upgrades. The aim of the game is to gather enough Æmber (pronounced "amber") to forge three keys before the opponent does the same. Creatures can reap Æmber and fight one another, while artifacts provide unique effects. Actions are used and discarded, and upgrades are attached to creatures to improve their abilities. Each card in KeyForge is associated with a House, with each deck containing cards from three Houses. At the beginning of each players' turn, that player declares a House - they may then only play, use, or discard cards belonging to that House. Unlike similar card games such as Magic: the Gathering and Android: Netrunner, cards do not typically require a cost to be paid such as the expenditure of mana or credits. Instead, a player may play and use as many cards on their turn as they wish, provided the cards belong to the declared House. KeyForge also differs from other card games in its approach to deck composition. Each deck features a unique card back with the name of an Archon; thus, decks cannot be modified with cards from other decks. Cards also cannot be traded or sold separately from their original decks, eliminating the possibility of "net decking" (a process in other card games of researching and recreating the most powerful decks). One of my friends at my locals claims that the rules and gameplay for KeyForge are very similar to the Battle Spirits TCG by Bandai.
  4. The DBZ-TCG Format and Other IPs

    There were so many flaws with Pan Z's update to the Score model in regards to the Dragon Ball IP that most of the issues seemed to have been corrected in the Dragon Ball Super CCG. It might not have the same feel to it given the absence of a uniqueness rule for characters, but the "color pie / wheel" is A LOT more balanced compared to how it was in Pan Z / Score Z where certain Styles were more dominant than others. It's as If the R&D team for Pan Z copied and pasted everything from Score Z without learning anything from the game's past mistakes leading up to the level of power creep we saw in GT. Had Pan Z kept going into Dragon Ball Super without relinquishing the license to Bandai, the game would've gotten about as worse as Fan Z has. There would still be morale within the existing community despite the PR suicide that RetroDBZCCG helped create, but given people's grievances with the Dragon Ball Super anime/manga as of late I'm not sure If they'd stick around for very long. I think what's helped the Dragon Ball Super CCG succeed compared to it's predecessor is that the learning curve is simple enough to where turn sequences aren't as complicated for beginners or for Pan Z / Score Z veterans who don't want to sit for hours on end to resolve one game. You might say that it takes a lot of skill away from the game when all it does is help further enhance the experience. As for other IP's that could greatly benefit from the Pan Z update to the Score model, the closest one I could possibly think of is similar to that Fighting Game off-shoot that Score released nearly two decades ago with Epic Battles featuring Mortal Kombat and Street Fighter that was later discontinued due to being a Blockbuster exclusive. Other than that I don't think there's very many IP's that could work the same way Pan Z's update to the Score model was for Dragon Ball. It was just THAT unique for it's time. By the way, Upper Deck already beat you to Marvel / DC with the Vs. System TCG being the better model over the Pan Z / Score model.
  5. Dragon Ball Super Anime Discussion

    Toriyama's not beholden to some other writer's version of his main character's origin (regardless of how much he's said he likes it). We already saw this version in Dragon Ball Minus - it's not a new development. We're simply seeing another divergence between "Toriyama-continuity" and "Toei-continuity" play out on screen. Just like Roshi's story of the Dragon Balls' origin or Dr. Frappe: "Our Lord Creator came up with something else, so we have no choice but to adapt that and quietly ignore what we came up with by ourselves." The Lucas comparison is a good one - the Expanded Universe was not his story or under his control, so he had no problems overwriting whatever he wanted when creating new material. And really, why should he? It's not his problem that some people treat these ancillary things like immutable stone tablets handed down by Moses. If somebody wrote an origin story for my protagonist as a tie-in novel or something, I'd probably ignore it if I wanted to tell that story myself, even if it was good - because chances are it never lined up with my notions of what that story would be anyway. Toriyama and Toei had a real opportunity to do something different with Dragon Ball Z, and that was to explore the history of the Super Saiyan or Saiyan God. They could have decided to tell us more about who those individuals really were and what they went through to get to that state, however; they decided to rehash some old idea that was done before. Stupidity. I get that they don't have as much creative space for new material due to the 3 year time gap between the end of the Buu arc and the 28th Tenkaichi Budokai but that isn't any excuse not to put in the effort. I think Zephyr from the Kanzenshuu forums said it best:
  6. Dragon Ball Super Anime Discussion

    Fair enough though I do find it odd that the trailer says that Goku, Vegeta, and Broly were born "around the same time" even though Vegeta is 6 years older than Goku. At this point why don't they just retcon more of the Dragon Ball mythos by making Mr. Satan Vegeta's grandfather or that the fusion dance was only a dream that Goku had since nothing's canon anymore. This is arguably the worst thing to happen to the Dragon Ball franchise since One More Day in Marvel Comics. What made characters like Goku and Bardock so appealing was that they were low-class nobodies who are essentially forced by random circumstances (whether it was a prophecy or a bump to the head) become heroes and overcome adversity. Now they're being turned into destined heroes which makes the original source material a lot more trite and boring.
  7. Dragon Ball Super Anime Discussion

    Based on the new trailer for the upcoming Broly film, Dragon Ball Minus is now canon. Apparently Toriyama decided to make Raditz non-canon, retcon Goku and Vegeta's past including Bardock's rebellion against Frieza, change Broly (which was obvious), and Paragus (as If that wasn't enough already). Then for some reason he decided to change Frieza's base form color scheme just like he did with Future Trunks' purple hair. Gogeta isn't safe either. All of these unnecessary changes happening 20+ years later when we could've just had like I don't know, A NEW STORY!?! The Dragon Ball Super anime has been confirmed to continue after the Tournament of Power arc next year with another retelling arc based on the upcoming Broly film. Really? After Battle of Gods and Resurrection 'F' they have us wait for ANOTHER new arc in the anime? Apparently Broly is going to be joining the Z Warriors as If we needed to add another Saiyan to the "roster" or should I say "peanut gallery". Why not focus on Gohan or Piccolo for a change? At least do something with Piccolo.
  8. https://magic.wizards.com/en/articles/archive/news/experimentation-2018-09-21 Amazon officially announced that they're cutting 37.5% MSRP on all new Magic booster boxes to $89.40. Since they're going toward a Direct-to-Consumer model, you probably don't think it's a bad thing since Amazon's been selling products directly to people for years. However when you buy on Amazon right now and for the last 10 years you bought Magic product from Local Game Stores across the country, they all listed their extra product on Amazon, eBay, or TCGPlayer in an attempt to liquidate and sell the remaining product they have to recoup their capital. Wizards of the Coast / Hasbro stepped in and said that we aren't allowed to do that anymore. So for those who own a Local Game Store or are a staff member at said store should not be paying more than $89.40 MSRP though it's more than likely that Wizards of the Coast / Hasbro is going to contact Amazon to try to raise that number. So regardless of the Expected Value (EV) of individual cards, $89 to $92 a box is the new MSRP for all Standard Magic boosters moving forward. So the next time you walk into your Local Game Store be sure to tell the owners and staff members that their price on Standard Magic boosters needs to be below the average MSRP. Doesn't matter If they aren't able to make money to keep the lights on or that they're unable to pay $1 thousand for overhead, that's their problem not Wizards of the Coast / Hasbro's. So when these Local Game Stores are paying $4 thousand a month on overhead or even $8 thousand a month depending on the employees, they're only allowed to make $5 a booster box at the most and If they have to sell online then they're required to lose 10-20% of their income as a penalty for buying too much product and it's their fault. So go ahead tell them that it's your fault for ripping them off by convincing them to match their MSRP with Amazon's to ensure that these Local Game Stores won't be around in 12 months by helping them go bankrupt. I wouldn't be surprised If other Trading Card Game / Collectible Card Game companies started following suit by partnering with Amazon as well. Wizards of the Coast / Hasbro asks: "How come you're not buying our Magic products after we partnered up with Amazon?" Consumer replies: "Well I don't have a place to play Magic as a way to hang out and socialize with my friends." Wizards of the Coast / Hasbro replies back: "Sucks to be you I guess."
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